Y is for…

YOLANDE DANIELS

.002%. That is the percentage of licensed black female architects in the United State. This places Yolande Daniels with these elite. She is the principal, founder, and female partner of Studio SUMO, a multidisciplinary architecture firm based in New York City. The firm got its name from Daniel’s childhood nickname, Momo, and her partner, Sunil Bald’s, first name. Currently serving as the 2011- 2012 Silcott Endowed Chair at Howard University, she also has lots of experience as a professor of architecture, teaching at University of Michigan, City Colleges of NY, and Columbia University;s GSAAP.

Sunil Bald (l) and Yolande Daniels (r) are Studio SUMO.

Some of this talented lady’s accomplishments include the 2006 Architectural Vanguard Award, which highlights the young phenoms in the field. Today Studio SUMO is over 10 years old and has an impressive portfolio of projects. The firm is focused on innovative solutions that use the physical, social, and cultural contexts to shape design. In 2010, Studio SUMO were selected by the Architetural League of New York for the Emerging Voices Competitions. Daniel’s work at the firm ranges from installations to large scale buildings. One of their highly publicized projects were the window treatments, marketing images and interior gallery space of the Museum of Contemporary African Diasporan Art. SUMO’s first international project, the Josai School of Management in Saitama-ken, Japan led to many projects with the university for their campus. Check out Studio SUMO’s work at their website or in the book New York Dozen: Gen X Architects by Michael Crosbie.

Studio SUMO's design for MoCADA.

Interior student lounge at Josai University designed by Studio SUMO.

Yolande’s ethnicity influences and adds to a few of the firm’s project’s, specifically the Mitan project in the Little Haiti neighborhood of Miami, as well as many exhibition designs for MoCADA. Her independent research is inspired by patterns and deriving formal strategies from non-linear, informal systems. She was recently honored with a travel award from AIANY to investigate and document slave spaces in Brazil, supporting her previous work examining architecture and the politics of space. Ms. Daniels also submitted the Tea Cozy installation to the Evergreen Museum in Baltimore which drew inspirations from Asian culture, Alice and Wonderland, and the museum tearoom. She represented the city of Philadelphia in her piece for “The Dresser Trunk Project” which examined locations of refuge during the Jim Crow Era.

Sumo's design for Little Haiti Housing Project.

Rendering of Little Haiti Housing Project's Courtyard space.

Throughout her professional work, both with Studio SUMO and on her own, Yolande Daniels always asks hard questions. Her design work pulls creative influences from many reference points, yielding intriguing spaces that draw you in and art pieces that make one take a second look. Ms. Daniels research draws from her field, examines ethnicity, and finds a way to marry the two with interesting studies that provide an often unheard perspective in the field. Frankly, we need more people like Yolande Daniels doing critical work in this world.

Daniel's piece for the Dresser Trunk Project.

Tea Cozy by Yolande Daniels.

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About Tya W.

Tya Winn: architect, urbanist, designer, cultural connoisseur, and the next great thing! View all posts by Tya W.

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